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Pornography

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Funny but after all these years I still own my first pressing I bought in Leeds that Saturday afternoon in 1982. It's in beautiful mint condition and I'm going to give it a deep clean wash via Spin clean tomorrow and really listen to it again. The band, Smith in particular, wanted to make the album with a different producer than Mike Hedges, who had produced Seventeen Seconds and Faith. According to Lol Tolhurst, Smith and Tolhurst briefly met with the producer Conny Plank at Fiction's offices in the hopes of having him produce the album since they were both fans of his work with Kraftwerk, [11] however, the group soon settled on Phil Thornalley. [8] Pornography is the last Cure album to feature Tolhurst as the band's drummer (he then became the band's keyboardist), and also marked the first time he played keyboards on a Cure release. [8] The album was recorded at RAK Studios from January to April 1982. [12] Wolk, Douglas (October 2005). "The Cure: Pornography". Blender. No.41. Archived from the original on 23 November 2005 . Retrieved 2 November 2015. Gill, Jaime (2 December 2004). "The Cure Seventeen Seconds, Faith, Pornography (Deluxe Editions) Review". BBC Music . Retrieved 28 October 2012.

Put simply, One Hundred Years is by far the most thrilling and terrifying opening act of any top 10 album from 1982. It’s probably still for me at least the strongest and most compulsively powerful opener on any Cure album period. There is nothing that comes even a third of the way close to its sheer rancorous claustrophobia, existential despair and sense of absolute ‘end of the world’ dread. The Cure: Pornography". Acclaimed Music. Archived from the original on 27 July 2013 . Retrieved 24 April 2013. In its place were cryptically opaque, bleached out and foggy soundscapes built on sparse instrumentation: Dempsey’s replacement Simon Gallup’s simple basslines, new member Matthieu Hartley’s unobtrusive synth drones, and robotic machine-like drumming from Tolhurst, topped with Smith’s distant, almost disembodied vocals and his economical off-kilter guitar. Smith said that "the reference point" for Pornography was the Psychedelic Furs' self-titled debut album, which he noted "had, like, a density of sound, really powerful". [16] Smith also cited Siouxsie and the Banshees as "a massive influence on me [...] They were the group who led me towards doing Pornography. They drew something out of me". [17] In 1982, Smith also said that the "records he'd take into the bunker after the big bang", were Desertshore by Nico, Music for Films by Brian Eno, Axis: Bold as Love / Are You Experienced by Jimi Hendrix, Twenty Golden Greats by Frank Sinatra and The Early Piano Works by Erik Satie. [18] Release and reception [ edit ] Following the band's previous album, 1981's Faith, the non-album single " Charlotte Sometimes" was released. The single, in particular its nightmarish and hallucinatory B-side "Splintered in Her Head", would hint at what was to come in Pornography. [8]a b Mason, Stewart. " Pornography – The Cure". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 24 July 2018 . Retrieved 21 March 2018. Not an album for the faint hearted I would add. There's no Love Cats or Inbetween Days here folks, just sheer misery but such wondrous grand misery, the music peels out in a glorious manner. Not for nothing did Cure fan and metal supremo Ross Robinson offer to produce one of The Cure’s later albums in 2004, in a conscious effort to get the band to record another similarly ‘angry and intense’ reprisal of his favourite album Pornography. However, the end result was a hugely uneven and disappointingly overwrought album which had none of the immediate devastating potency or claustrophobic intensity that Pornography served up, just somewhat inferior contrived attempts at familiar themes, which just goes to prove the old adage that any band can try and revisit or emulate their previous glories but seldom to the same degree of effectiveness. The Cure: Pornography" (Press release). Fiction Records . Retrieved 11 September 2013. From on-fiction.com Retrospective views of Pornography have been far more favourable. [8] In his biography of the Cure, Never Enough: The Story of the Cure, Jeff Apter wrote that it "turned out to be the kind of album—just like Lou Reed's Berlin or Bowie's coke-fueled Low—that required some distance and a good few years of music history to be really appreciated". [8] In 1995, Mark Coleman of Rolling Stone noted that Pornography had come to be "revered by Cureheads as a masterstroke", while noting that "normal listeners will probably find it impenetrable". [8] Stewart Mason of AllMusic found it to be "much better than most mainstream critics of the time thought", but at the same time "not the masterpiece some fans have claimed it to be" and "just a bit too uneven to be considered a classic". [24] In 2004, Jaime Gill of BBC Music singled out the album's "sonic depth and sheer relentless conviction" for praise, adding that without these qualities, its "extraordinary misanthropy would be laughable". [34] Uncut called Pornography "a masterpiece of claustrophobic self-loathing." [35]

a b Considine, J. D. (2 September 1982). " Pornography". Rolling Stone . Retrieved 13 October 2012. Well, to be truthful, in light of what transpired a few weeks later when he took the band out on their Fourteen Explicit Moments tour, he had taken the Cure as far as they could possibly go down that particular road. Because the band self-destructed shortly afterwards after a fight at a bar in Strasbourg when Smith and Simon Gallup came to blows, the pressure of maintaining the sheer intensity of the material by having to perform it and the rigours of touring anyway, having a detrimental effect on the mental health and wellbeing of the entire band and their crew.Breakthrough top 40 hit A Forest (number 31 in March 1980) distilled all of the album’s strongest elements into one near-six minute slice of post-punk perfection. It’s still one of the greatest ’80s singles of all time. Abebe, Nitsuh (12 May 2005). "The Cure: Seventeen Seconds / Faith / Pornography". Pitchfork . Retrieved 13 October 2012. For me at least, The Cure had always been this unassuming new wave act who had that brilliant first top 40 hit A Forest in the glorious year of 1980 (who were labelmates with The Passions, who had their only hit, I’m In Love With A German Film Star, in 1981) and then abruptly disappeared again…. but I was obviously not paying much attention. Maybe I thought they were just Joy Division copyists?

Beaujon, Andrew (April 2005). "66.6 Greatest Moments in Goth". Spin. Vol.21, no.4. pp.70–73 . Retrieved 27 October 2012. Even to this day, very few albums sound like these two. And to be fair, not even The Cure themselves have ever equalled them, let alone surpassed them. But to be honest, they don’t need to. The legacy is completely perfect as it stands. Eventually the end result was a finished recording that sounded for all the world as uncompromisingly brutal as the troubled circumstances which helped bequeath it. Indeed, in 2003, The Cure performed all three albums in their entirely, in chronological sequence on a tour, which was later captured film and officially released as the DVD ‘Trilogy’.Sonically, at least, Pornography (the album) sounds like a completely different band from the last two albums, let alone their debut. It is hard to reconcile the sheer heaviness of the sound and the tropes and motifs expressed on this fourth album with the similarly downbeat but appreciably less chaotic lyrical themes on the previous two.

Roberts guitar sound here made me change my own guitar set up. I went out and bought a digital echo unit, placed upon the top of a mike stand, so I could easily manipulate the controls in real time during a live performance. I did not need to use any other effect pedals at all, just layers of tumbling echo. There will always be endless debates about which exactly is everybody’s favourite Cure record. My obsession with the Pornography album did not happen immediately as I was still largely unaware of their music save for the two hit singles that they had prior to this (A Forest and Primary). I was still far too engrossed in buying the records of Siouxsie and The Banshees and a few of the electronic synth pop bands of the time to really take much notice, despite the obvious fact that The Cure was one of their contemporaries. Nevertheless, one band who remained defiantly averse to much of this was The Cure, who chose relative low-key anonymity over the high-falutin’ jinks beloved of so many of their contemporaries, following a trajectory over their previous three albums from sprightly if somewhat geeky post-punkers to consummate doom-merchants, clearly taking some inspiration from one of the bands that supported them in 1979 – Joy Division. Recording sessions were chaotically stop-start, with the band getting ever more immersed in the twin evils of drink and drugs (the most infamous outcome of this ongoing overindulgence was the giant mountain/pyramid of empty beer cans they had assembled in one corner of the studio). Thanks Robert !! We were called DNA from Wakefield and have a few releases listed even on here. But it's mainly down to The Cure and this album that affected my guitar playing and song writing style.Polydor Records, the company in charge of Fiction, was initially displeased with the album's title, which it saw as being potentially offensive. [8] Music and influences [ edit ] Out went their regular producer Mike Hedges, who helped craft the sonic ambience of their previous two albums, and in came a previously unknown engineer whom Smith decided to hand the reins to – Phil Thornalley. Smith was reportedly impressed with his work as assistant engineer on a Psychedelic Furs album the previous year (Talk Talk Talk), in particular the drum sound, so set to work on consciously writing drum patterns specifically tailored for the new material he was working on that would comprise the new album, which would be less downbeat and far more intense.

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